Focus on output, not on input

For many people working remotely, it's difficult to detach from the traditional 8 hours of input. But think about how you'd spend your 8 hours at the office, certainly not crunching away behind your desk for the total amount of time.

Focus on output, not on input
Photo by Estée Janssens / Unsplash

It's the end of the week, you cross off the final item from your to-do list, and before you head into the weekend, you have one last look at your time report.

You only averaged 6 hours a day this week.

Now how do you feel?

You should feel happy that you've crossed everything off your list, you've reached this week's goals, and you've put in your best effort!

But then you get this nagging feeling; "If I had put in 8 hours a day, I would have gotten more done" or "if my manager sees this, he thinks I don't put in enough effort."

Is that true? You've set goals at the beginning of the week/month, and you've reached them.

Rather than focus on how much time you've put in (input), focus on what you've gotten done, what goals you've reached, and what projects you moved forward (output).

So, focus on your output, not your input.

If you are worried about your input, take on a bit more work next week. But remember that some weeks are less busy than others, while other weeks require a bit more time and effort. It's about balance.

For many people working remotely, it's difficult to detach from the traditional 8 hours of input. But think about how you'd spend your 8 hours at the office, certainly not crunching away behind your desk for the total amount of time.

Water cooler conversations, grabbing some coffee or a snack, meetings that could have / should have been an email, and the time you'd spend on your phone or social media.

Focus on what you've got done at the end of the week and what progress you've made. Because if you are hitting or even exceeding your goals, no one cares about how many or few hours you've put into it.